Artists Space

The Issues of Our Time (3):
Less Time More Issues

April 12 – April 27, 2014

Curated by castillo/corrales

A clay sculpture of a person, outstretched on a sofa, with miscellaneous items around them, is displayed on a wooden foor.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A clay sculpture of a person, outstretched on a sofa, with miscellaneous items around them, is displayed on a wooden foor.]

This third edition of the project The Issues of Our Time follows two previous iterations at castillo/corrales, a co-operatively run non-profit art space in Paris. In the context of Artists Space Books & Talks, the project will involve contributions from artists, writers and curators including Valentin Boure, Thomas Boutoux, Antonia Carrara, Andreas Führer, Joachim Hamou, Egija Inzule, Morag Keil, Hans-Christian Lotz, Mélanie Matranga, Fionn Meade, Lili Reynaud Dewar, Kari Rittenbach, Jason Simon, and Benjamin Thorel.

With the subtitle “Less Time, More Issues,” the event-based exhibition is structurally thought of as an open-ended setting: a site for circulating problems and methods, keeping the trace of social constraints and intimate behaviors.

When making things public, what makes sense is what takes time; what takes value are displacements, misunderstandings, and trafficking. Commonplaces, stories, well-worn references and emotions, are the tokens that allow us to handle the awkward and embarrassing necessity of how-to-perform-one’s-own-life. Some may rely on adolescence once again, and the naivety factor that is supposed to come along with it; others would turn to the truth-telling essayistic rhetoric, considering the distance they have with themselves. There’s no reason to take for granted the usual, inevitable, forms-of-life and self-assured acts-of-thought. “In youth we are, but in age we seem.” Is that to say we never become?

It’s not so much that moods and affects have to be kept secret and hidden. Do we have to say it once more – they’re structured through déjà-vu, and we already found most of the words for them in half-forgotten songs and brusque quotes. What matters, tonight, is what is behind the scene, not as something mysterious, or as one of the last tricks in the sleeve; but as the dailyness of things, the eventlyness of it all: the course of our lives, observed from too close a distance, in the middle of affairs. In the shadow of a moment things are irrevocably done – as if there was no time to say, “yes” with any conviction.

Something ever comes of all persistent inquiry; we are not so continually curious for nothing. We may already be over-fond of a certain imaginary image of our lives and friends; and then refer to a certain imagined ghost of that same imagined image. What is at stake is not the search for the “right” stuff or position – it’s the possibility to deal with prerequisites in order to twist the game.

April 13, 2014

No Lectures
Conversation & Screening
7pm

April 16, 2014

The Biographical Illusion
Screening & Discussion
7pm

April 18, 2014

Restless
Performance & Screening
7pm

To the right, a gray silhouette of a women with her hands on her hips on a white wall. Exposed wires to the left near her legs lead to a box on the ground. A TV monitor sits on the ground in front of the back of a projection screen positioned between two standing speakers.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [To the right, a gray silhouette of a women with her hands on her hips on a white wall. Exposed wires to the left near her legs lead to a box on the ground. A TV monitor sits on the ground in front of the back of a projection screen positioned between two standing speakers.]
On the left, two cream colored folding chairs sit underneath a clear lampshade descending from the ceiling. On the right, the back of a projection screen positioned between two standing speakers. A monitor sits on the ground beneath the screen.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [On the left, two cream colored folding chairs sit underneath a clear lampshade descending from the ceiling. On the right, the back of a projection screen positioned between two standing speakers. A monitor sits on the ground beneath the screen.]
A TV monitor, positioned on the ground with it
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A TV monitor, positioned on the ground with it's wiring exposed, its headphones on the ground. It displayes a still image of a washed-out portrait that implies movement through the blurring and repeititon of the face.]
Two grey silhouettes displayed next to each other on a white wall. In front of them, a table displays colorful documents.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Two grey silhouettes displayed next to each other on a white wall. In front of them, a table displays colorful documents.]
Four copper squares embedded with images and text lean against a white wall sitting on tan carpet.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Four copper squares embedded with images and text lean against a white wall sitting on tan carpet.]
A miniature clay sculpture sitting on a gray table. The sculpture depicts a woman folding over, cross-legged, on carpet. Miscelaneous items are dispersed across the carpets.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A miniature clay sculpture sitting on a gray table. The sculpture depicts a woman folding over, cross-legged, on carpet. Miscelaneous items are dispersed across the carpets.]
A miniature clay sculpture of a man sitting, cross-legged, in an armchair is displayed on a carpetted floor. Where the carpet meets wooden floor, a curled wire extends from underneath the carpet.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A miniature clay sculpture of a man sitting, cross-legged, in an armchair is displayed on a carpetted floor. Where the carpet meets wooden floor, a curled wire extends from underneath the carpet.]
A clay sculpture of a person, outstretched on a sofa, with miscellaneous items around them, is displayed on a wooden foor.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A clay sculpture of a person, outstretched on a sofa, with miscellaneous items around them, is displayed on a wooden foor.]
Divided into two sections, wooden floor on the left and carpet floor on the right. On the left, a table displays colorful documents. On the right, four minature copper squares sit on the ground next to two cream colored foldable chairs. Multiple wires extend across the floor and under the carpet.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Divided into two sections, wooden floor on the left and carpet floor on the right. On the left, a table displays colorful documents. On the right, four minature copper squares sit on the ground next to two cream colored foldable chairs. Multiple wires extend across the floor and under the carpet.]
Gray silhouettes are displayed on adjacent walls. Miscellaneous items are displayed on gray tables. A microphone and its extended wire lays on the floor in front of a speaker.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Gray silhouettes are displayed on adjacent walls. Miscellaneous items are displayed on gray tables. A microphone and its extended wire lays on the floor in front of a speaker.]
Three large windows are covered with a sheer fabric that includes faded printed text and images. Two gray silhouettes are displayed on the adjacent wall to the left. To the right, an electrical panel with exposed wires sits in the corner.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Three large windows are covered with a sheer fabric that includes faded printed text and images. Two gray silhouettes are displayed on the adjacent wall to the left. To the right, an electrical panel with exposed wires sits in the corner.]
A black cord sticks out from underneath a tan carpet. Wires are visible running underneath the carpeted floor throughout the frame.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A black cord sticks out from underneath a tan carpet. Wires are visible running underneath the carpeted floor throughout the frame.]
Three metal cutouts of hands act as holders for neon green cards displayed on the wall. The hand on the right is holding up its middle finger.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Three metal cutouts of hands act as holders for neon green cards displayed on the wall. The hand on the right is holding up its middle finger.]
Three metal cutouts of hands act as holders for neon green cards displayed on the wall. The hand on the right is holding up its middle finger.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Three metal cutouts of hands act as holders for neon green cards displayed on the wall. The hand on the right is holding up its middle finger.]
A metal cutout of a hand, holding up its middle finger with others bent, is used as a holder for neon cards displayed on the wall. The card reads in black text, "High five, girls earned the point, they have a good feel."
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [A metal cutout of a hand, holding up its middle finger with others bent, is used as a holder for neon cards displayed on the wall. The card reads in black text, "High five, girls earned the point, they have a good feel."]
Three metal cutouts of hands, each displaying a different finger expression, hold stacks of white, blue, and purple cards on the wall.
Installation view from The Issues of Our Time, Artists Space, New York, 2014 [Three metal cutouts of hands, each displaying a different finger expression, hold stacks of white, blue, and purple cards on the wall.]

The Issues of Our Time (3) forms part of a series of events organized by curator Fionn Meade, occurring across several spaces in downtown New York and addressing the shifting relationship between art and value. This series takes place as part of ART², a month-long platform presented by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., in collaboration with the New York presenters Institut français, the French Ministry of Culture and Communication and FACE (French American Cultural Exchange).

This project is also funded in part by Etant donnés: the French-American Fund for Contemporary Art, a program of FACE and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., with funding from the Florence Gould Foundation.